Keena Ford

keena cover

Keena Ford and the Second Grade Mix-up

By Melissa Thomson, Illustrated by Frank Morrison

 

Published by: Dial; 1 edition (July 3, 2008)

Available in: hardcover, paperback, Kindle

At the time of this review there were three books in Keena Ford series.

 

No mix-up: Keena’s a star.

I’m pleased to start the New Year with a review of a fresh, inventive, lively, newer series. Current in mood and dialed into today’s kids, Keena Ford is, in my view, an unequivocal success.

Keena is a second grader who lives in a Washington D.C. apartment during the week with her brother and divorced mother. On weekends, she stays with her dad in Baltimore. She’s an effervescent imp much like the Junie B. Jones character, and yet I find Keena more likable, realistic and believable. Call Keena sassy with spunk and a sprinkling of delightful innocence.

Keena also is black, a rarity for a chapter book protagonist. Although many secondary characters in chapter books are of various ethnicities, most protagonists tend to be Caucasian. I do a lot of school visits and those inquisitive, cute faces looking back at me are every shade of the skin rainbow. It’s bizarre that fiction has been slow to reflect that. So Keena is one welcome little girl.

The plots of the three books in the series are also new and invigorating. In Keena Ford and the Second-Grade Mix-Up, a problem with numbers spawns some delicious drama that leaves Keena with real cake on her face. The second and third books revolve around mix-ups on a visit to the Capitol in Washington, D.C. and a lost journal. In the later book, secret thoughts get in the hands of a real meanie, and of course difficulties ensue.

Perhaps what I love most about Keena is her heart and emotional pulse. Kids will understand why she gets mixed up, feel for her as she struggles to find a solution that keeps her out of trouble, and, when trouble inevitably finds her, laugh and commiserate with her fate. She’s emotionally intuitive—she explains her thoughts and emotions without hitting the reader over the head with repetitive excess.

Morrison’s fresh and casual illustrations are life-like, simple line drawings. But each drawing is set in a box, which makes them full and complete. They enhance the text and give the work literary heft.

All combined, Keena has drama, heart and verve that portrays a normal girl—with much more than average results.

What do you say teachers, parents and writers? Use the comment below and let’s chat….

 

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